Show data from the GitHub API in Google Sheets, using Apps Script and Oauth

This post shows you how to connect a Google Sheet to GitHub’s API, with Oauth and Apps Script. The goal is to retrieve data and information from GitHub and show it in your Google Sheet, for further analysis and visualization.

If you manage a development team or you’re a technical project manager, then this could be a really useful way of analyzing and visualizing your team’s or project’s coding statistics against goals, such as number of commits, languages, people involved etc. over time.

Contents

  1. What are Git and GitHub?
  2. Access GitHub API using Basic Authentication
  3. Access GitHub API using OAuth2 Authentication
  4. Resources and further reading

Note, this is not a post about integrating your Apps Script environment with GitHub to push/pull your code to GitHub. That’s an entirely different process, covered in detail here by Google Developer Expert Martin Hawksey.

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Data Cleaning and Pivot Tables in Google Sheets — My New Course has launched!

Data Cleaning in Google Sheets

There’s a joke in the data community that goes:

“You’ll spend 90% of your time cleaning data, and the other 10% of your time complaining about that…”

Do you deal with badly formatted data that takes you hours to tidy up, preventing you from making progress on your “real” work?

Ever wondered what the heck a Pivot Table is, and why you should care about them?

Do you ever find yourself repeating a process manually, like extracting zip codes from addresses?

This new course is designed to help you work with messy, real-world datasets. It’ll teach you techniques and best practices for cleaning data and preparing it for analysis and reporting.

This new course is aimed at beginner-to-intermediate Google Sheets users.

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How to add a total row to a Query Function table in Google Sheets

This article looks at how to add a total row to tables generated using the Query function in Google Sheets. It’s an interesting use case for array formulas, using the {...} notation, rather than the ArrayFormula notation.

So what the heck does this all mean?

It means we’re going to see how to add a total row like this:

How to add a total row to a Google Sheets QUERY table
Table on the left without a total row; Table on the right showing a total row added

using an array formula of this form:

= { QUERY ; { "TOTAL" , SUM(range) } }

Now of course, at this stage you should be asking:

“But Ben, why not just write the word TOTAL under the first column, and =SUM(range) in the second column and be done with it?”

Well, it’s a good question so let’s answer it!

The reason for using this method is because the total line is added dynamically, so it will be appended directly at the end of the table, and won’t break if the table expands or contracts, if more data is added.

It’ll always move up or down, so it sits there as the final row.

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How to reply to Google Forms survey responses quickly with Sheets & Apps Script

Google Forms survey email tool system
1. User submits Google Forms survey
2. Response logged in Google Sheet
3. Google Apps Script parses responses and sends emails
4. Original user receives reply!

You’re happy!

You sent out a Google Forms survey to your customers and received hundreds of responses.

They’re sitting pretty in a Google Sheet but now you’re wondering how you can possibly reply to all those people to say thank you.

Manually composing a new email for each person in turn will take forever. It’s not an efficient use of your time.

You could use an ESP like Mailchimp to send a bulk “Thank You” message, but it won’t be personal. It’ll be a generic, bland email and nobody likes that. It won’t engage your customers and you’ll be missing an opportunity to start a genuine conversation and reply to any feedback from the survey.

Thankfully, there is another way.

Of course there is, otherwise why would I be writing this tutorial! 😉

By adding a reply column to your Google Sheet, next to the Google Forms survey responses, you can efficiently compose a personal response to every single survey respondent.

Then, using Google Apps Script (a Javascript-based language to extend Google Apps, start here if you’re new), you can construct an email programmatically for each person, and send out the responses in bulk directly from your Google Sheet.
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How to create an annotated line graph in Google Sheets

Animated e-junkie sales chart in Google Sheets
Animated line chart in Google Sheets

This post looks at how to create a more advanced line graph in Google Sheets, with comparison lines and annotations, so that the viewer can absorb the maximum amount of insight from a single chart.

For fun, I’ll also show you how to animate this line graph in Google Sheets.

Want your own copy of this line graph?

Click here to access your copy of this template >>

This chart was originally developed for The Write Life during their 4-day product sale earlier this year. It featured as part of a dashboard that was linked to the E-junkie sales platform and displayed sales data in real-time:

Google Sheet e-junkie real-time dashboard
Google Sheet e-junkie real-time dashboard

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